#MonthlyMyth

#MONTHLYMYTH: STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN DELIBERATIVE PROCESSES

#MONTHLYMYTH: STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN DELIBERATIVE PROCESSES

We’re kicking off our 2019 #MonthlyMyth series by addressing a topic we’re often asked about. We’ve noticed that it’s an issue that makes organisations nervous.  There’s a fear that (where a randomly selected panel or jury is involved) stakeholder and interest groups will be cut out of the conversation and oppose the process or decision.  

Luckily, not only is it important to incorporate these groups in a deliberative process, there’s also lots of ways they can be involved.    Today we’re exploring why it’s a good idea to do so, and giving you seven ways to bring them on your deliberative journey.

#MONTHLYMYTH: LOW INFLUENCE = LOW RISK

#MONTHLYMYTH: LOW INFLUENCE = LOW RISK

This month’s myth addresses mistaken assumption that offering people less influence over a decision translates to the organisation having increased control over the process and outcomes. 

Some engagement processes lend themselves to a lower level of influence than others, However, if the intention is to reduce influence in an attempt to ‘manage’ the process, control outcomes, cut corners or minimise time and resources, organisations can find themselves in hot water. 

Read on for 6 key questions you can ask to determine the right level of influence and a list of helpful reading and resources. 

#MONTHLYMYTH: PREP THE PLAN FIRST

#MONTHLYMYTH: PREP THE PLAN FIRST

Want to get the best possible value out of the consultant or facilitator you engage?  Hoping to minimise wasted time, money and resources?  Seeking to deliver an engagement process that’s as effective as possible?  Our tip: don’t develop a detailed engagement methodology before you appoint your consultant. 

This month’s myth explores the potential consequences of this all too common error and provides 4 steps to achieving the best possible return on your consultant investment and delivering an effective process.

#MONTHLYMYTH: MORE IS MORE

#MONTHLYMYTH: MORE IS MORE

Often, the purpose of an engagement process (or one phase of an engagement process) is to cast the net wide, capturing as many views and voices as possible.   Often, this is a good approach, particularly at the beginning of a longer engagement process.  What you generally don’t want to aim for, however, is the highest possible volume of feedback and data, with no regard for how useful or informed that input is.

Today we’re highlighting why you might get an overload of responses – many of which aren’t relevant to the issue at hand, why this is a problem, and how you can avoid it for your next process.

#MONTHLYMYTH: EMCEES & FACILITATORS

#MONTHLYMYTH: EMCEES & FACILITATORS

Sometimes, as facilitators, we find ourselves in awe of a skilled Master of Ceremonies (emcee).  Some emcees can really bring an event to life, confidently engaging the audience and seamlessly pull an occasion together with effortless flow and poise.  Where appropriate, the best MC’s will also inject humour and entertainment and make an event ‘sparkle’.

The reason we’re so impressed is that this isn’t our core skill set! Contrary to popular belief, these two roles aren't interchangeable.  To address this month's myth, we interviewed a professional emcee and professional facilitator, gaining first hand insights into these two unique worlds. 

#MONTHLYMYTH: FOCUSING ON THE FEW

#MONTHLYMYTH: FOCUSING ON THE FEW

It’s important to consider and tailor your engagement approach to ensure you meet the needs of all stakeholders, and that includes those who have the most to say.  

This mistake, however , lies in forgetting about everyone else. Suddenly, you realise the needs and opinions of a few have demanded time, attention and resources at the expense of the rest of your stakeholders or community.

Today we’re addressing this myth by providing 9 ways to ensure diverse perspectives make it into your next process.

#MONTHLYMYTH: NO ADULTS ALLOWED! PLAY IS FOR KIDS

#MONTHLYMYTH: NO ADULTS ALLOWED! PLAY IS FOR KIDS

When you think about the word ‘play’, what do you imagine?

We’re going to hazard a guess and assume what you don’t see is a group of adults considering important issues or strategic concepts.  That’s because cultural norms suggest that play is more at home in a playground than a boardroom. 

In this month’s myth buster, we’re going to ask you to put that limiting belief to one side for a moment.  We’re exploring how play can be used to achieve positive outcomes and new possibilities in the professional world.  Because, as it turns out, adults (even the suit-wearing ones) and organisations (even the big serious ones) might benefit from a little game now and then. 

#MONTHLYMYTH: TRANSPARENCY & RISK GO HAND IN HAND

#MONTHLYMYTH:  TRANSPARENCY & RISK GO HAND IN HAND

‘Transparency’ is a key term in the world of engagement.   We all know that it’s central to any robust, effective engagement process.

It’s also a word that, for some, goes hand in hand with risk and a loss of order and control.  That makes sense - because being honest, sharing the problem and providing in-depth insights into an issue can feel scary. 

Today, we're addressing this myth and providing some reasons to be brave, risks to be aware of and key starting points when it comes to transparency.