Free resources

DILEMMA DISCUSSED: ‘HOSTILE’ AUDIENCES & HIGH EMOTION

DILEMMA DISCUSSED:  ‘HOSTILE’ AUDIENCES & HIGH EMOTION

This post tackles a big, scary dilemma – conflict, outrage and emotion.  We’re often asked for advice around this topic, because it’s something that worries many people in the engagement space -  even experienced practitioners and facilitators.

Partly, this fear is underpinned by a lack of ‘tools’ or skills. So, we’re going to give you some tips to help you prepare for and/or work with conflict, outrage and emotion in a meaningful way. 

Because it’s a big, difficult topic, we’re going to address it in two parts:  Part one (this post) is about how to plan for it, and in part two (next month) we’ll talk about what to do if you walk into it unexpectedly.   

#MONTHLYMYTH: FACILITATORS NEED TO BE CONTENT EXPERTS

#MONTHLYMYTH: FACILITATORS NEED TO BE CONTENT EXPERTS

Facilitators work across many industries, audiences and topics, and sometimes the issues or information being considered are complex or technical.  We’re often asked how we manage to move across so many broad ranging issues and projects, and whether we need to become ‘experts’ in each topic before we facilitate.

This #MonthlyMyth explores some of the misunderstandings that sit behind this myth, highlights the true role of a facilitator, and uncovers how facilitators really work with information and content.

#MONTHLYMYTH: DELIBERATION IS ALWAYS THE ANSWER

#MONTHLYMYTH: DELIBERATION IS ALWAYS THE ANSWER

Deliberation can be refer to either a micro-process (something you can build into part of a session or engagement process) or a full deliberative democracy process (such as a citizens’ jury).   

Deliberative engagement has a lot of potential benefits - these processes can lead to new solutions to challenging problems, improve policy outcomes and engender trust between citizens and decision makers.

So, is deliberation always the right answer/process? The short answer is no. 

#MONTHLYMYTH: STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN DELIBERATIVE PROCESSES

#MONTHLYMYTH: STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN DELIBERATIVE PROCESSES

We’re kicking off our 2019 #MonthlyMyth series by addressing a topic we’re often asked about. We’ve noticed that it’s an issue that makes organisations nervous.  There’s a fear that (where a randomly selected panel or jury is involved) stakeholder and interest groups will be cut out of the conversation and oppose the process or decision.  

Luckily, not only is it important to incorporate these groups in a deliberative process, there’s also lots of ways they can be involved.    Today we’re exploring why it’s a good idea to do so, and giving you seven ways to bring them on your deliberative journey.

#MONTHLYMYTH: LOW INFLUENCE = LOW RISK

#MONTHLYMYTH: LOW INFLUENCE = LOW RISK

This month’s myth addresses mistaken assumption that offering people less influence over a decision translates to the organisation having increased control over the process and outcomes. 

Some engagement processes lend themselves to a lower level of influence than others, However, if the intention is to reduce influence in an attempt to ‘manage’ the process, control outcomes, cut corners or minimise time and resources, organisations can find themselves in hot water. 

Read on for 6 key questions you can ask to determine the right level of influence and a list of helpful reading and resources. 

CRITICAL THINKING: IAP2A RESEARCH AWARD (+ FREE RESOURCES)

CRITICAL THINKING: IAP2A RESEARCH AWARD (+ FREE RESOURCES)

We’re very pleased to announce that, together with partner Dr. Lyn Carson of Deliberative Designs, we have won the 2018 IAP2 Australasia Core Values Award for Research. We feel very honoured to have had this exciting work recognised in this way.

To celebrate, we’re providing everyone with all the digital resources and materials that have been produced to date as a result of this work. Providing these resources to others is in line with our commitment to enhancing the quality of deliberative processes, and our aim to encourage quality engagement practice everywhere.

(continue to the bottom of this post to access all the resources).

#MONTHLYMYTH: PREP THE PLAN FIRST

#MONTHLYMYTH: PREP THE PLAN FIRST

Want to get the best possible value out of the consultant or facilitator you engage?  Hoping to minimise wasted time, money and resources?  Seeking to deliver an engagement process that’s as effective as possible?  Our tip: don’t develop a detailed engagement methodology before you appoint your consultant. 

This month’s myth explores the potential consequences of this all too common error and provides 4 steps to achieving the best possible return on your consultant investment and delivering an effective process.

VIDEO: DELIBERATION JOURNEY - PARTICIPANTS' PERSPECTIVES

VIDEO: DELIBERATION JOURNEY - PARTICIPANTS' PERSPECTIVES

This one has been a long time in the making.  Finally, we can announce that our latest 'Deliberation Ready' video is here.  This edition is particularly exciting because, for the first time, we've interviewed participants from across multiple deliberative processes

Together, these 10 citizens share their unique perspectives and provide candid, first hand reflections on their journey - the challenges, the surprises, the highlights and more. 

#MONTHLYMYTH: MORE IS MORE

#MONTHLYMYTH: MORE IS MORE

Often, the purpose of an engagement process (or one phase of an engagement process) is to cast the net wide, capturing as many views and voices as possible.   Often, this is a good approach, particularly at the beginning of a longer engagement process.  What you generally don’t want to aim for, however, is the highest possible volume of feedback and data, with no regard for how useful or informed that input is.

Today we’re highlighting why you might get an overload of responses – many of which aren’t relevant to the issue at hand, why this is a problem, and how you can avoid it for your next process.